FREEDOM EQUINE

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 C1.U8.3

RBEI MASTER COURSES:  EQUINE MANAGEMENT:

PADDOCKING & STABLE MANAGEMENT 3

 

Besides providing a safe environment and one that does not induce fear, it is also necessary to provide a horse with a home environment that is not depressing, boring and mind numbing.

Leaving a horse locked in a mundane and unstimulating environment without any interacting with other horses or people and without any sunlight or natural light will create depression, and a horse which acts up.

 

Ideally horses enjoy being out free to roam around in the the sun during the day with or directly alongside friends.  

At night they enjoy being tucked away in a dry, warm, clean stable with a nice feed and clean fresh water, alongside their peers.  Then let out first thing in the morning again. 

It is a great idea to provide toys also.  Horses do get bored just standing around day in and day out and many don't get to go out daily, but rather get a little outing on weekends only, if that, so it is important to provide other fun, games and stimulation.  Other horses and a social life is a great way to mitigate this.

While hierarchy will create a bit of drama and bark off initially it will generally iron out over time and everyone will be happier.  However if there are new horses joining the group constantly this will create too much continuing drama and it would be better to separate horses out into longer term groups of three.

If you have two in a paddock they will become clingy and create drama when one is taken out.  Three is the ideal number for paddocking together.  However not in a tiny yard, three horses should have at least one acre minimum together.

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